dying matters awareness week

08/05/2017

Only 25 per cent of British adults has asked a family member about their end of life wishes, according to research by the Dying Matters Coalition.

Just 35 per cent of adults said they had made a will and only seven per cent had written down preferences about their care if they are unable to make decisions for themselves.

The type of funeral you would prefer or your wishes for your estate, children, even pets aren’t necessarily a natural topic of conversation at the dinner table.

Despite the fact that death is one of life’s certainties, it remains something of a taboo subject.

This week is Dying Matters Awareness Week. A week dedicated to breaking down barriers and encouraging people to talk about end of life wishes and plans.

From a legal perspective, the importance of having a proper end of life plan cannot be underestimated.

Most people are aware that having a will is essential if you want to make sure your wishes are carried out after you pass away, although many people still don’t have one.

There are other steps you can take to create certainty for the future, such as the lasting power of attorney. This enables you to appoint a person to make financial or welfare decisions for you should you be unable to do so yourself. Without a lasting power of attorney decisions about your care and finances might end up being made by someone who you would not have chosen.

Dying Matters Awareness Week is organised by a coalition of health, care, housing, voluntary, faith, community, funeral and legal sectors determined to break the taboo and get people talking about dying, death and bereavement. More information is available here

If you have any questions about wills, trusts, probate or lasting power of attorney, please contact Sarah Mellor at Beswicks Legal on 01782 205000 or sarah.mellor@beswicks.com