Business Law

Assignment of the benefit of a contract
Use this document to assign the benefit (i.e. to transfer the benefit) of the rights you have under a contract. Most rights are capable of being assigned - for example, rights to benefits under insurance policies, rights to repayment of a loan, rights to purchase property and so on. However, it is important to note that you cannot assign any rights under a contract if the contract expressly prohibits that. Close
Assignment of debt and notice
If you wish to assign the payment of a debt that is owed to you to another person (the assignee), you can use this document to do so. Once this debt has been assigned and the debtor has been notified of this assignment, the debtor will pay the debt to the assignee. This document will also create the required notice to the debtor, informing him/her that the debt has been assigned. Close
Terms and conditions for the reverse of a goods invoice
This document contains a set of terms and conditions that are suitable for someone who sells goods to other businesses. A large volume of sales business is done in reliance upon standard terms and conditions of sale. These are commonly found on the reverse side of a sellers invoice. It is very important to take the time to read the form in its entirety to ensure that it is appropriate for use in your individual situation. Please note that you cannot use this document if you are selling goods to consumers. Close
Terms and conditions for a website selling consumer goods or services
This document creates standard terms and conditions for the sale of goods and/or services to consumers from a website in the United Kingdom. It is not suitable for a business providing financial, leisure, accommodation and transport or catering services. This document has been drafted to be used with a professionally developed website which contains the statutory information that must be provided to all consumers. It also contains an optional agreement for the terms of use of a website. Close
Purchase order
This document is a purchase order with standard terms and conditions for the supply of goods. It has been drafted from the point of view of a purchaser of goods (as opposed to the seller) and is designed to protect the interests of the purchaser. The effect of a successful incorporation of these terms and conditions into any contract for the supply of goods would be that both purchaser and seller would be bound by the obligations set out. Close
Agreement for the supply of goods (non-retail)
Use this document to create an agreement for selling goods to another trade party. This document cannot be used by anyone selling to consumers (i.e. persons not acting in the ordinary course of business). The agreement covers such issues as time for payment, consequences of non payment, rights of cancellation, etc. so that the terms and conditions of this agreement are clear. Close
Distribution agreement
Use this document to create a distribution agreement whereby one business, typically a manufacturer, supplies goods to another for resale or onward supply. To use this document, the business supplying the goods must present the distributor with standard conditions of sale and a standard price list. The agreement will set out the obligations of the distributor and supplier and the terms under which they do business. Close
Agency agreement
Businesses sometimes find it necessary to appoint agents in order to expand within the UK while maintaining control over the expansion. The agent will negotiate and secure contracts for the principal business in return for a commission. This document creates an agreement regulating such a situation. It also contains a clause to deal with the effect of the Commercial Agents (Council Directive) Regulations 1993, S 1 1993/3053 which is relevant if the agency is for goods rather than for services. Close
Trade mark licence agreement
This is an agreement whereby a person licenses another to use a trade mark within a specific area. There are provisions whereby the goods bearing the trade mark be manufactured in accordance with certain specifications and be of the highest quality. Close
Non-disclosure agreement
This document produces an agreement which allows one party (the discloser) to reveal to the other (the recipient) information which the discloser considers to be confidential. It is mainly designed for situations where the recipient is considering investing in the discloser and therefore needs to evaluate confidential information. In situations where there is a joint venture, where both parties need to protect their confidentiality, our "Mutual non-disclosure agreement" should be used instead. Please note that in order for this agreement to be enforceable in the UK, the discloser must be resident in the UK. Close
Mutual non-disclosure agreement
This document produces a mutual non-disclosure agreement (mutual NDA) which allows two parties to protect confidential information when they are negotiating a joint venture. If negotiations fail, the agreement will help to protect information from being made public. Care must be taken to ensure that the information which it is intended to keep confidential is marked as being confidential. Please note that in order for this agreement to be enforceable in the UK courts, at least one of the parties needs to be resident in the UK. Close
Terms and conditions for a website selling consumer goods or services
This document creates standard terms and conditions for the sale of goods and/or services to consumers from a website in the United Kingdom. It is not suitable for a business providing financial, leisure, accommodation and transport or catering services. This document has been drafted to be used with a professionally developed website which contains the statutory information that must be provided to all consumers. It also contains an optional agreement for the terms of use of a website. Close