Relationship

Change of name for a child
You can easily change the name of your child using this document, provided that you have parental responsibility for that child. Note, however, that you cannot use this document if there is more than one other person with parental responsibility for the child, or if there is only one other person with parental responsibility for the child but that person does not consent to the name change. This document is only suitable for minors (i.e. under the age of 18) and British citizens. If your child is aged 16 or over, he or she will also need to give consent to the change of name by signing in both his/her new and old name. Please note that it is only suitable for use in England & Wales. Close
Change of name for an adult
This document will create a deed poll or statutory declaration (as required) to change your surname and/or first name. Please note that you cannot use either option to change the name of a minor, i.e. anyone under the age of 18. This document can only be used in England & Wales. If you select the deed poll option, you have a further option to register the document with the Royal Courts of Justice, which involves advertising the name change. To use the option to register the deed poll, you must have the details of a person who has known you for at least ten years, is a householder in Britain and is willing to swear a statutory declaration on your behalf. You must also be a British citizen. Close
Dissolution of civil partnership pack
Dissolving your civil partnership can be difficult, so we've done our best to make the process as quick and simple as possible. This pack includes the Civil Partnership Dissolution Petition required to start the process, along with the rest of the documents that could subsequently be needed. Additionally, the Civil Partnership Dissolution Petition can instead be used to apply for a Separation, which can divide your assets and responsibilities like a dissolution, while your civil partnership remains. Form D36: Notice of application for conditional order to be made final If you have petitioned (or have received a petition) for a dissolution and the court has made a 'conditional order', you can use this document to apply for a 'final order' which will legally end the civil partnership. If you are the petitioner, you must wait at least 6 weeks before sending this document to the court. If you are the respondent, and the petitioner has not already applied, you must wait at least 3 months and 6 weeks before sending this document to the court. Once the final order has been granted, your civil partnership will be at an end. Please note that this is only suitable for use in England & Wales. Form D8: Dissolution/separation petition This document must be used to start dissolution or separation proceedings and is formally called a 'petition'. A dissolution order brings a civil partnership to an end. A separation order does not have this effect, but does relieve the parties to a civil partnership from their legal obligation to live together. Please note that this document is only suitable for use in England & Wales. Form D80B: Statement in support of dissolution/separation - behaviour If you have served a petition for civil partnership dissolution or separation on your civil partner on the ground of unreasonable behaviour, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the dissolution/separation order. If you have not yet completed the document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree', you should do so now. Please note that this document is only for use in England & Wales. Form D80C: Statement in support of dissolution/separation - desertion If you have served a petition for civil partnership dissolution or separation on your civil partner on the ground of desertion, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the dissolution/separation order. If you have not yet completed the document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree', you should do so now. Please note that this document is only for use in England & Wales. Form D80D: Statement in support of dissolution/separation - 2 years' consent If you have served a petition for civil partnership dissolution or separation on your civil partner on the ground of a 2-year separation (with their consent), use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the dissolution/separation order. If you have not yet completed the document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree', you should do so now. Please note that this document is only for use in England & Wales. Form D80E: Statement in support of dissolution/separation - 5-year separation If you have served a petition for civil partnership dissolution or separation on your civil partner on the ground of a 5-year separation, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the dissolution/separation order. If you have not yet completed the document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree', you should do so now. Please note that this document is only for use in England & Wales. Form D84: Application for conditional/separation order Use this document to produce a completed Form D84, which must accompany the affidavit in support that you file with the court to confirm the details and grounds of your dissolution/separation petition. Once these documents together with the respondent's acknowledgment of service are lodged with the court, the matter can be officially listed and a decision taken as to whether you will be granted the order. Note that this procedure is only applicable where your civil partner (the 'respondent') does not wish to contest the dissolution - therefore you can only use this document if this is the case. This document can only be used in England & Wales. Form D8A: Statement of arrangements for children (dissolution/separation) You will need to use this document when you start dissolution or separation proceedings and there are any 'children of the family': children under 16, or aged 16 or 17 and at college or school, undergoing vocational training full time, that were either adopted by both you and civil partner or have been treated by both you and your civil partner as a child of the family (not including foster children). The purpose of the document is to enable the court to consider the arrangements you propose for the children after the dissolution/separation. In exceptional circumstances it can hold up the process until satisfactory arrangements are made for them. Please note that this document is only for use in connection with dissolution or separation proceedings in England & Wales. Close
Divorce pack
Divorcing can be difficult, so we've done our best to make the process as quick and simple as possible. This pack includes the Divorce Petition required to start the process, along with the rest of the documents that could subsequently be needed. Additionally, the Divorce Petition can instead be used to apply for a Judicial Separation, which can divide your assets and responsibilities like a divorce, while you remain married. Form D36: Notice of application for decree nisi to be made absolute If you have petitioned (or have received a petition) for a divorce and the court has pronounced the 'decree nisi', you can use this document to apply for the 'decree absolute' which will legally end the marriage. If you are the petitioner, you must wait at least 6 weeks before sending this document to the court. If you are the respondent, and the petitioner has not already applied, you must wait at least 3 months and 6 weeks before sending this document to the court. Once the decree absolute has been granted, you and your ex-spouse will be able to marry or enter into a civil partnership. Note that a judicial separation does not require you to apply for a decree absolute. Please note that this is only suitable for use in England & Wales. Form D8: Divorce/judicial separation petition This document must be used to start divorce or judicial separation proceedings and is formally called a 'petition'. This document is not suitable for those who wish to start an application to obtain an annulment of their marriage. (An annulment is when the court declares that a marriage is null and void because it satisfies one of 8 special circumstances, such as not being consummated or where one party did not consent to the marriage.) Please note that this document is only suitable for use in England or Wales. Form D80A: Statement in support of divorce/judicial separation - adultery If you have served a petition for divorce or judicial separation on your spouse on the ground of adultery, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the decree of divorce/judicial separation. This statement must be submitted with a duly completed and signed application for a decree nisi or judicial separation decree. If you have not yet completed such a document, you should do so now using our document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree'. Please note that this document is only for use in England and Wales. Form D80B: Statement in support of divorce/judicial separation - behaviour If you have served a petition for divorce or judicial separation on your spouse on the ground of unreasonable behaviour, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the decree of divorce/judicial separation. This statement must be submitted with a duly completed and signed application for a decree nisi or judicial separation decree. If you have not yet completed this, you should do so now using our document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree'. Please note that this document is only for use in England and Wales. Form D80C: Statement in support of divorce/judicial separation - desertion If you have served a petition for divorce or judicial separation on your spouse on the ground of desertion, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether to grant the decree of divorce/judicial separation. This statement must be submitted with a duly completed and signed application for a decree nisi or judicial separation decree. If you have not yet completed this, you should do so now using our document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree'. Please note that this document is only for use in England and Wales. Form D80D: Statement in support of divorce/judicial separation - 2 years' consent If you have served a petition for divorce or judicial separation on your spouse on the ground of two years' separation (with their consent), and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether to grant the decree of divorce/judicial separation. This statement must be submitted with a duly completed and signed application for a decree nisi or judicial separation decree. If you have not yet completed such a document, you should do so now using our document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree'. Please note that this document is only for use in England and Wales. Form D80E: Statement in support of divorce/judicial separation - 5-year separation If you have served a petition for divorce or judicial separation on your spouse on the ground of a 5-year separation, and they have agreed not to contest the petition, use this document to draw up a statement confirming the details of the petition. You must sign the statement and file it with the court. A district judge will then decide whether or not to grant the decree of divorce/judicial separation. This statement must be submitted with a duly completed and signed application for a decree nisi or judicial separation decree. If you have not yet completed such a document, you should do so now using our document 'Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree'. Please note that this document is only for use in England and Wales. Form D84: Application for decree nisi/judicial separation decree Use this document to produce a completed Form D84, which must accompany the affidavit in support that you file with the court to confirm the details and grounds of your divorce/judicial separation petition. Once these documents together with the respondent's acknowledgment of service are lodged with the court, the matter can be officially listed and a decision taken as to whether you will be granted the decree. Note that this procedure is only applicable where your spouse (the 'respondent') does not wish to contest the petition - therefore you can only use this document if this is the case. This document can only be used in England and Wales. Form D8A: Statement of arrangements for children (divorce/judicial separation) You will need to use this document when you start divorce or judicial separation proceedings and there are any children of the family: children under 16, or aged 16 or 17 and are at college, school or undergoing vocational training full time, that were either born to or adopted by both you and your spouse or have been treated by both you and your spouse as a child of the family (not including foster children). The purpose of the document is to enable the court to consider the arrangements you propose for the children after the divorce/judicial separation. In exceptional circumstances it can hold up the final decree (the 'decree absolute' in divorce cases, or the decree of judicial separation in judicial separation cases) until satisfactory arrangements are made for them. Please note that this document is only for use in connection with divorce or judicial separation proceedings in England and Wales. Close
Pre-nuptial agreement (per couple)
Use this document to state what should happen to assets should your marriage or civil partnership end. Although prenuptial/pre-civil partnership agreements are not legally enforceable in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, they do carry more weight since the judgement in the Supreme Court case of Radmacher vs Granatino (20 October 2010). This is because they are no longer seen as 'contrary to public policy' - i.e. no longer seen as perversion of justice or harmful to the state and the public. Courts should give effect to such agreements when deciding on settlements. This means that the terms of the agreement should be implemented when certain criteria are met. Some such criteria include that the court must, at the time of the separation, be in a position to find that, the agreement was entered into freely, voluntarily and without undue pressure; both you and your partner fully appreciated its implications and offered full disclosure of all relevant information; both you and your partner intended the agreement to be effective and to govern the financial implications of divorce/dissolution; it would be fair to hold the parties to the agreement at the time of the divorce/dissolution. It is important that each of you take independent legal advice on the agreement before signing it. The agreement is for use when the parties intend to permanently live in England, Wales or Northern Ireland. Close
Pre-civil partnership agreement (per couple)
Use this document to state what should happen to assets should your marriage or civil partnership end. Although prenuptial/pre-civil partnership agreements are not legally enforceable in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, they do carry more weight since the judgement in the Supreme Court case of Radmacher vs Granatino (20 October 2010). This is because they are no longer seen as 'contrary to public policy' - i.e. no longer seen as perversion of justice or harmful to the state and the public. Courts should give effect to such agreements when deciding on settlements. This means that the terms of the agreement should be implemented when certain criteria are met. Some such criteria include that the court must, at the time of the separation, be in a position to find that, the agreement was entered into freely, voluntarily and without undue pressure; both you and your partner fully appreciated its implications and offered full disclosure of all relevant information; both you and your partner intended the agreement to be effective and to govern the financial implications of divorce/dissolution; it would be fair to hold the parties to the agreement at the time of the divorce/dissolution. It is important that each of you take independent legal advice on the agreement before signing it. The agreement is for use when the parties intend to permanently live in England, Wales or Northern Ireland. Close
Cohabitation agreement (per couple)
Use this document to create a cohabitation agreement to protect the interests of a cohabiting couple who are not married or in a registered civil partnership, and are either already living together or plan to live together in a home that they are renting or which is owned by one or both parties. This document will regulate the financial interests of the couple during the relationship and, upon termination (should their relationship come to an end), deal with common issues, such as the division of joint assets, the mutual home and joint bank accounts. In England and Wales there is no formal legislation which makes cohabitation agreements legally enforceable, but given that a cohabitation agreement is a contract existing between two parties, so long as it complies with the basic requirements of contract law, it should be legally enforceable (more information on this is included within the notes of this document). Therefore, each member of the couple is advised to take independent legal advice as to the terms and conditions of the agreement before signing it. This agreement is only for use when the parties intend to live in England or Wales. Close